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#21 [url]

Nov 29 10 3:24 AM

Hi Norma,
Great pics from Philip eh!. Here's another of those people, the good the bad and the ugly!. Billy R, Ray C, She who must be obeyed, Willie C, and Paul W
Enjoy
All the best
Malcolm



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clive

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#23 [url]

Dec 2 10 12:47 PM

Dear Cecilia,

I remember Sister Sybil M Perrott, FTCL, LRAM,  as she was transferred from Harrogate on promotion and appointed Sister in Charge at Killay House, the Swansea Branch of the NCH in 1968.  She was originally from the Llanelli area and served as a candidate at Killay House before being trained at Stephenson Hall, Highbury.

Best wishes,

Clive

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#24 [url]

Dec 2 10 12:50 PM

Dear Cecilia,

I roared with laughter at your contribution that your "brother Stewart and Sister Sybil having a set to and Stewart ended up being put outside the back door in the snow !..... to get his own back he snowed up the door, so, you can imagine what happened next !

I bet Sister Sybil was not best pleased!

Best wishes,

Clive

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#25 [url]

Dec 2 10 1:01 PM

Dear All,

It has been good to read these contributions and to see the Harrogate photos and to think, Malcolm, that I was recently in Vancouver.  What a small world.  We do not know how many Old Boys and Girls of NCH are scattered around in so many different countries of the world.  I often wonder what happened to Andrew Ocansey who was at the NCH Swansea Branch.  It is great that the Internet and sites like this can bring people together.

Best wishes,

Clive

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#26 [url]

Dec 3 10 12:20 AM

Hi Clive,
All over the world is right!. As  my recently reunited friend Norma said, finding the site and seeing the pics told her that there was life before 1960, (the year she left), and she lives in Italy.
 And, having read some of the sadder stories, I think we were very blessed at Harrogate.
Thank you to all you contributors, whatever branch your from
.malcolm


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#27 [url]

Dec 6 10 2:08 PM

HI there, couldnt help reading your messages as i was at fairfield too but later on 1967 to 1972. The photo from the closing ceremony brought a real lump to my throat. I didnt even know it was happening despite living in harrogate. Did you go or can you tell me anything about it? I wish i had been able to go. i was so young there and recall very little but i do have some photos of the place.

They made it into a housing estate and i was gutted to see part of my past wiped out like that.

Cheers jackie

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#28 [url]

Dec 8 10 10:10 AM

Hi people, I was at fairfied along with my younger sister from 1971 to 1975 or there abouts, I lived in number 8 and the persons there were Ian and his wife lyn who were the house masters and we had an aunty denise who came in to help out
 I cant remember too much due to only being 7yrs old when i arrived there. But can remember going to Rossett Acre school.
My friend lived in number 7 called yvonne and we made up a club called the wombles (as children do)
I vaguely recall some names of the other children in the house, joseph, val, elaine im afraid i dont have surnames or any photos, so it was nice to see the pics on here.

Thankyou for letting me waffle on abit

Dot

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#29 [url]

Dec 8 10 12:36 PM

Hello there, does anyone remember Bob Moor???  He was (I guess) the chaplain/rev.  and lived in the sickbay until he was posted elsewhere.  During my travels I was in Jamaica in October/November 1980.  I had heard that Bob Moor and family were working at the NCH there so decided to drop in and visit him!   You wouldn't read about it!!   He and his family had left the week before to go work in Barbados.  Not a bad job!!!!  Anyhow never did catch up with him.

To Jacksr:-  I do remember Auntie Sylvia but have no further info because I was a very busy teenager during my time at Fairfield.

Sylvia Swan (nee Bambrough)

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#30 [url]

Dec 10 10 8:47 PM

Dear Sylvia,

THE REV BOB MOORE

JAMAICA’s TRAINING OFFICER


The Summer 1973 edition of NCH Family News reported that “Harrogate branch’s former Deputy Superintendent, the Rev Robert (‘Bob’) Moore, has been appointed Training Officer for the new Jamaica branch.  He will be responsible to the Superintendent for a training course there, and act as tutor, working with the University of the West Indies.


Mr Moore is a Methodist Sector Minister who joined NCH four years ago, but he has been involved in child care work for many years.  He came to Harrogate from Redbank School in Newton-le-Willows, Lancashire, where he was a house-master and teacher and at the same time chaplain to Winwick Hospital, a large mental hospital next to the school.  Previously he had spent four years in circuit work, but even then one of his major interests was working with children.  ‘I couldn’t get away from delinquent kids in the circuit’ he said.


After his first trip to Jamaica – a fortnight’s visit with the Principal in January – Mr Moore is excited about the appointment.  Mrs Moore, who is a nurse, will be involved in the work.


At present Mr Moore is based at the training college in Highbury while attending a course for lecturers in social work at the National Institute of Social Work Training.  He expects to leave for Jamaica in August”.

 

Best wishes,

 

Clive

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#32 [url]

Dec 13 10 11:51 PM

Hi Clive, Thanks for the info.  Sometimes life surprises me although only a little!!  Following my return to the UK in late 1981 I found my comfort zone in working the the elderly.  In 1986 I went on the Huddersfield Poly to train in Social Work.  When I came to Australia in 1989 I landed a job as a locum lecturer in Welfare Work at a local College.  The reason I am making mention of this is because I have suffered with clinical depression since a teenager.  Bob Moore (at Fairfield) took me aside and told me that some people actually enjoyed being depressed!  I remembered thinking that, he clearly had no idea just how debilitating depression could be and I couldn't imagine anyone enjoying the experience.
During my time at Fairfield I never felt understood and was told how pathetic I was and was accused of moaning too much.  I am over the hurt and anger but I have a younger sister who has reminded me from time to time of my awful unhappiness by repeating those same words (pathetic, moaner)  I have never been happier in my life than I am now but I put this down to years of counselling to rid myself of the hell I and my siblings lived in prior to living at Fairfield.  My brother sadly never got any help and was place at Bryn Alyn Hall in North Wales - the very same establishment which was exposed in the mid 80's due to the children who suffered at the hands of the great man John Allen who was given 6 years in prison for his sins.  There is a web site 'Bryn Alyn Community' which offers some support to those who survived.  My brother took his own life in 1985 as did many other boys from Bryn Alyn.
I am still very gateful to NCH for providing me with a safe place to stay and with the opportunity to go to College which opened doors enabling me to acquire more productive employment.

Sylvia Swan (nee Bambrough)

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clive

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#33 [url]

Dec 14 10 3:39 PM

Dear Sylvia,

Thanks for your message and for sharing your personal thoughts.

 

Yes, sometimes life surprises us all and I was pleased you had found your comfort zone in working with the elderly and I am sure you could give me a few tips as I care for an 85 year old friend.  It is great that you went to the Huddersfield Polytechnic to train in Social Work and you must feel proud that you not only coped with the challenge of moving to live and survive in Australia but you also secured a job as a College locum lecturer in Welfare Work.  Well done.  I am sorry you have suffered with clinical depression since a teenager.  I cannot understand why Bob Moore told you that some people enjoyed being depressed.  That is ridiculous.  I agree that in the 1970’s, he must have had little idea just how debilitating depression could be and I couldn't imagine anyone enjoying the experience.

It is very sad that during your time at Fairfield you never felt understood.  That experience probably applies to many youngsters that were in residential care.  It is great that you now feel over the hurt and anger and it would be helpful if your younger sister chose not to remind you of your previous unhappiness.  I am pleased that you have never been happier in your life than you are now and the years of counselling were very beneficial and would help many other people in a similar situation.  I was very sad to learn that your brother never got any effective help and wonder if he went to Bryn Alyn Hall instead of going to the NCH Harrogate Branch?  It is tragic that your brother took his own life.  I wonder if we could turn the clock back and if your brother had received the care and support that he needed, would he be alive today.

Take care.

Best wishes,

Clive


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#34 [url]

Dec 16 10 10:04 AM


His name was Jack (John) Unwin and he came from Leicestershire. He had an older brother Les who came back less often. I think the bespectacled person behind him on his left shoulder is Paul Manser who had an older brother David. The Mansers were in No.2 with Sister Edith as I was with my brother Stephen.
David Green (42-54)

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#36 [url]

Dec 16 10 5:50 PM

Thank you David,
I was mad at myself that I couldn't remember John Unwins name after all the years that he came back. The others are: L-R, Paul Manser, Billy Robins, Ernie Blagg,Bobby Marshall, Me, Dave Hodge, and, you were nearly right, Ray Crisp, who sadly passed away about six years ago. I dont know the feller in the dark glasses, It might be Mr Niven who arrived after I'd left. I was in Uk in September and having 'found' Brian Crisp through our great website, I went down south and visited him, we hadn't seen each other for, wait for it,56 years!, it was a great reunion. I was in #1 for twelve of my fourteen years with Sister Beth, the other two being in the nursery down Green lane. I can just remember you and Stephen, I was ten when you left, were you the cricketer along with Brian?.
Thanks again David
Malcolm Tomlinson

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#37 [url]

Dec 17 10 3:04 PM

Yes Malcolm we both played cricket with Brian Roycroft,Joy Hill (Bless her) and others. Stephen also played table tennis. I'll make a note on my desk here and if I can will send you some pictures you'll enjoy.

Stephen and I went to Ashville College which was a fantastic opportunity. Sadly neither of us excelled academically but the homes structure didn't exactly lend itself to just a very few who had homework etc. Stephen had a long career in the Fleet Air Arm and rose to CPO. I went into banking and became a senior commercial banker by the end of my 35 years with Lloyds.

Did you hear about Brian Roycroft's death?

More later.

David
PS thanks for the names.

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#39 [url]

Dec 17 10 7:10 PM

Phillip can you help me understand how to upload a picture? I clicked on upload files and selected my picture but hasn't worked. is there a fools guide? I really would be grateful for some instruction as I have some great snaps I wish to share. David Green

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clive

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#40 [url]

Dec 18 10 3:08 PM

Dear David,

BRIAN ROYCROFT

Charismatic social services director with a passion for justice

One of the most charismatic and influential social services directors of the last 30 years, Brian Roycroft, who has died aged 68 following a heart attack, was, literally, born into the job - at the children's home in Frodsham, Cheshire, run by the National Children's Home (now NCH). His mother and father worked there as houseparents, and Brian and his sister moved with them from children's home to children's home.

He became director of social services at Newcastle-upon-Tyne when the department was created in 1971, and retired nine years ago, but he served not only his adopted city with distinction but also the cause of social work and childcare nationally.

When he took over, there were few, if any, qualified social workers in Newcastle; Brian was instrumental in creating one of the first departments to boast an almost 100% qualified workforce. But professionalism meant more to him than having a qualification, which is why he found the social work strike of 1978-79 so painful and damaging. He allied long experience, enormous energy, commitment and passion with great articulacy, which gave him the ear of government ministers and civil servants, and the respect and admiration of the profession. It made him one of the two or three most forceful advocates for childcare and social work in Britain.

Despite his family background, Brian was, at first, undecided on a job. He had won a fellowship to the Methodist public school, Ashville College; then nat- ional service experience, as an RAF pilot and officer dealing with often uneducated NCOs, persuaded him to do something socially useful.
He trained as a social worker at Birmingham and Leeds universities. In 1957, he became a childcare officer with Hertfordshire, where the novelist and social worker John Stroud was his supervisor. In 1961, he became assistant area officer for the London county council children's department and, three years later, went as children's officer to Gateshead , where he had to buy a bowler hat to wear for work.

Brian became children's officer in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1967. One of his first cases was that of the child murderer Mary Bell, whose biographer, Gitta Sereny, called him "one of the finest social workers in the country" and referred to "his passion for social justice".

Today, with government favouring care trusts and primary care trusts, and social work in danger of being subsumed within the NHS, it is difficult to imagine that very heaven which saw the departments' dawn in 1971. Brian's gifts as a young manager, an increasingly wily politician and a forceful conference speaker were ably suited to the optimism and expanding budgets that characterised the early years, and helped to set the departments on an exciting course.

However, he came to see that the specialist skills and knowledge of childcare workers would be lost in the all-purpose departments. He also came to believe that the later change of role for local auth- orities - from providers to commissioners - distanced workers from their clients, and social services committees from services.

Brian was one of only two members of the Association of Directors of Social Services to serve as both president and secretary, and continued on the national stage even when he left office. For some years, he served on the social and economic committee of the then EEC. In retirement, he took on a number of positions, including the chair of a local housing association he had founded. Until recently, as chairman of the Alzheimer's Disease Society, his expertise was often sought abroad.

Brian had been successfully treated for cancer over the last year, although at one time his prognosis was very poor. However, when I saw him in March, after his chemotherapy ended, he was his customarily optimistic and good- humoured self, as ever enjoying a good malt and gossip. He was planning a big celebration for his 70th birthday next year. "Then I am looking forward to tackling the next 10 years," he said.

He is survived by his second wife Pat, a social worker, their daughter Emma, and the two children of his first marriage.
 
&#183 Brian Roycroft, social services director, born October 29 1933; died May 24 2002

Best wishes,

Clive

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