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#561 [url]

Aug 3 11 8:18 PM

Hi DI
bet its still got Malc's finger prints on !!!!!!

 I remember that bedroom being the boys bedroom, and Graham Starkey was far more naughty that Malcolm, take my word for it!!!!!  I read the other day that you mentioned Dorothy Downing attending the reunion, I am certain I knew her, she wasnt one of the sisters I dont think.

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#563 [url]

Aug 4 11 12:52 AM

Thank you Malc,
Your so right, We Malcs would'nt dream of such things. (do 'em yes, think 'em No).
Please eat this message after reading, dont want the others to know, nudge, nudge
Take Care
Malc T

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malsal

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#564 [url]

Aug 4 11 1:22 PM

Hi Malc didn't taste very good, think I'll have to take wife out for a curry and a pint of that hoppy water what we have to do to survive ,oh you might be right about doing and not thinking I've never been a Thinker  .all the best  see you next month    Malc S

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#566 [url]

Aug 4 11 8:57 PM

My Dear Miriam,
How happy and pleased I am to find that the little girl, (rug rat, ankle biter), that I knew, has grown up to be such a wise and clearly, well read and discerning woman of impecable taste.
Thank you for your  brief but succinct comment re :The Malc's. You shall be reward when we meet again.
Take care Miriam
love
Malcxx

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#567 [url]

Aug 5 11 12:01 PM

There have been several postings about the layout of the houses at Harrogate.  Descriptions of the hall & stairs, and a diagram of a dormitory    ........    These pages are supposed to be for Harrogate pictures, but of course we all carry these in our heads, and these are the pictures that I carry in my head of the kitchen at number seven.
It was a real old fashioned country kitchen.  Square, with a big pine table in the middle where sister Flora would spend many hours, busily at work.  Breakfast for twelve hungry children would begin with a bowl of cornflakes or wheatabix, always followed by a cooked breakfast which consisted of bacon with something like tomatoes.  In winter there would be lovely porridge, which was prepared the night before and left to stand on top of the cooker to be heated up in the morning.  And I'll never forget the size of those enormous teapots which contained the tea ready mixed with milk & sugar.   Of course everyone would help to clear the table after we'd eaten, and there was a rota for the washing up.  Before we came home from school in the evening, sister Flora would spread innumerable slices of white bread to have with meat paste or marmite, and always make sure there was some sort of cake for tea.  Try as I might, I've never been able to replicate the delicious fruit loaf she made with the  nice brown crust  ........   We all had school dinners during the week, but on Sundays there would be a PROPER Sunday lunch with a joint of meat and vegetables that would be fit enough to grace any family table.  It is only with hindsight that I realise now, how very hard the sisters worked, just to keep us well fed.
The floor in the kitchen was laid with beautiful quarry tiles which would be swept and mopped every morning before being covered with newspapers to absorb the excess moisture.  We used to have an elderly Polish lady to help with the morning cleaning at number seven, who's english vocabulary was very limited, but she had no difficulty in letting us children know that she didn't approve of us walking on her freshly washed tiles !  I don't know if any of the other houses had a daily help for a few hours each morning, or if perhaps this was restricted to number seven in order to help sister Flora who had such severe arthritis and suffered with a painful hip.

On one wall of the kitchen was a big inglenook which contained the oven and the central heating boiler.   The big clothes rack was suspended from the ceiling just in front of the inglenook, where it could take advantage of the heat.  Taking care of the boiler was the job of whoever happened to be the oldest boy in the family. One of the first noises we'd hear when we got out of bed each morning, was the loud rattling of the ash-pan as he removed the clinker.  He would then  fill the hod with coke which was stored in a shed outside, just underneath the verandah.  And another sound I shall never forget, was the frequent hollow clanking in the central heating radiators, when they had an 'airlock' which reverberated through the house as though somebody was running a stick across them  ....  On this wall between the kitchen & dining room was a very deep cupboard which had a door in both sides and was used as a serving hatch.  It was plenty big enough to get into, and I'm sure I'm not the only one to use it as a hiding place when we had a game of hide-&-seek.


On the wall opposite the inglenook were three doors leading to three pantries each with a large stone slab shelf.  The One on the far left had a window with a zinc mesh cover to keep out the flies.  It was in here that any 'leftover' food was kept, such as the remains of the joint which was invariably turned into mince.  This was done by one of those old fashioned hand operated machines which screwed to the top of the table.  Sister turned the handle, and the meat would come out at the other end in rather unappetising grey lumps.  However, nobody complained when it was heated up with a tasty gravy and served with mash.  Of course we didn't have the luxury of a fridge in those days, but things seemed to keep pretty well.  There was always a big lump of cheese on the shelf, and numerous loaves of sliced white, wrapped in greaseproof paper.  Several big enamel bins containing dried goods such as rice & flour stood on the floor, along with the milk crate holding bottles which always had a nice layer of yellow cream on top.    ......    The middle pantry was full of baking equipment and an assortment of interesting tins which very often held cakes and biscuits, which for some reason were always kept just out of reach on the top shelf   .....  The last pantry was the least interesting of all because it only held the large pots & pans that were used for cooking.  The only food that was ever to be found in here, was a big pan of cold boiled meat, with a layer of yellow fat floating on the surface.  I don't know what sort of meat it was, but it was kept for the dog.  Our Sally.

Lastly, high up on the back kitchen wall above the sideboard, was a gadget that had originally been installed to summon whoever happened to be working in the kitchen, to other parts of the house.  It consisted of a series of numbers & bells that would presumably be activated by whoever happened to press the corresponding bell in any of the other rooms.  However, to my knowledge, this gadget was never put into use, so it just hung on the wall as a decorative relic.

Despite being rather old fashioned by todays standards, I'd be very happy to have this kitchen in my house today.  
Jennifer






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#568 [url]

Aug 8 11 5:40 PM

just read your description of No 7. It almost made me cry !! How sad is that & I would never have imagined I would feel so nostalgic when I was actually there all those yeats ago!!. There's many a night when I can't sleep & I picture each room there. Have to disagree though Jen about your so called LOVELY porridge. I absolutely loathed it & still do to this day!! I always looked forward though to the bolied eggs & warm crispy rolls on a Sunday morning!! The kitchen had it's own unique & very evocative smell( especially the no3 larder with the pots /pans, soap( hard blocks of green & Lifebouy). Do you remember the baking sessions with the cake mix which made HUGE sandwich cakes. Don't forget the fruit cupboard at the end wall . We were allowed half an apple or orange but many a time a 'little mouse' managed to sneak in & take a dirty great bite & then hide the evidence!! It wasn't just the lads that had to declinker the boiler  & light the firesI.became a dab hand @ it as well as chopping sticks!!

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#569 [url]

Aug 8 11 5:57 PM

Hi Dorothy ! I always thought that it was the semolina pudding the girls did,nt like  Western school dinners were terrible all the fatty meat we were forced to eat. Yes Jennifer has a brilliant memory about no 7, it all started coming back to me even the small details like the wicker baskets for the laundry, ( but she omitted the famous pudding bowl haircut )
Love Terry

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dianaw

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#570 [url]

Aug 30 11 8:27 PM

Hi Vi, The only photo I can find of your brother, who we called Harry, was of the boys with their leaving cases etc., on the drive.  It is somewhere on this topic but I've posted it for you again.
From left to right.  Alan Graham, Peter Hesse, Fred Tutin, Steve G, Harry Nudd & David Manser. Sorry it's a bit blurred, maybe Steve has got a clearer one.  love Di


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#571 [url]

Aug 30 11 10:03 PM


Hi Di,Already got this pic of Harry [his name was John Henry ]but because there was already a John and a Henry in number 5, they called him Harry. It is Arthur i am looking for a photo of, he was 2yrs older than me. He went to the grammer school in Harrogate,and think he went into the RAF when he left the home.He died in 2006, i found that out through finding his daughter on Facebook,she lives in Leeds and i keep in regular contact with her. Thats one of the reasons i am trying to find a photo of him, for her as well as for me. It's lovely to see this photo again of our Harry,plus i remember all the other boys on it, thanks again love Vi x  I think i put on an earlier post that we arrived at Harrogate in 1942,not so ,our mum died in 1943, so must have been then x

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#573 [url]

Oct 12 11 8:07 AM

TROUGOTT WINKLER


About four years ago I wrote to Trougott because we had booked a Baltic cruise which would be going through the Kiel Canal and having kept in touch with him over the years I knew he lived in that area. In fact when I looked at the map I realised he lived within 20 miles of it and I tried to arrange for him to come to the canal and meet me. I had obtained approval from the cruise operators and the port authorities and awaited a reply from Trougott but alas none was forthcoming.
Then I received a letter from one of his two sons, Stefan. The letter had been delivered from the last address to his widow who had moved and she asked Stefan to reply. Sadly Trougott had passed away in 2001 which explains why I had no letters from that time onwards.
Stefan has kept in touch by email and latterly has viewed the forum website and was overjoyed to see pictures with his father on them especially that one taken of a group of us in Wellfield orchard.
I emailed him recently and referred to the reunion we enjoyed in September and asked if he would kindly send me a photograph of his father taken in more recent times and also whether he could see his way to writing a potted history of his life after returning home from Harrogate.
Bear in mind that this is a German writing in English and how can we fail to be impressed with his language skills. So here it is

 

About Traugott Winkler

 

After his return from England to Germany in 1952, my father Traugott Winkler attended school in a little town named Preetz. The town is located in the eastern part of Schleswig-Holstein, which is the northest federal land of Germany.  After having past his “A” levels in 1957, he studied theology in Marburg and Kiel. In 1965, he was ordinated as a protestant pastor and moved to a village named Kropp, where he did his ministration until 1980. The members of the congregation liked him very much because of his kindness, diligence and dedication. Being the leader of the ecclesial trombone choir, some people gave him the sobriquet “Pastor of trombones”.

 

In 1965, he married my mother Heinke Muhs, an organist,  in Preetz. They got 2 children, my brother Axel Winkler, born in 1967 and myself, Stefan Winkler, born in 1966. Axel  is a mechanical engineer, employed at the Volkswagen-Group in the city of Wolfsburg, Niedersachsen. He is married and has an 8-year-old son. Myself, I am administrative officer at the local authorities dwelling in the city of Schleswig, Schleswig-Holstein.

 

Regrettably, in 1980 my father Traugott Winkler had to retire because of mental illness, already at the age of 44. In consequence, our family moved to the city of Schleswig, which is located near Kropp. Temporarily, my father could do some ecclesial functions since this time.

 

On the 27th of June in 2001, my father died on the basis of a chronic disease of the lungs. He is buried on the churchyard in Kropp, the village where he spent a particular happy period of his life concerning family, profession and health.  

 

Stefan Winkler

Schleswig, 02nd of Oktober 2011


A sad story but I'm sure several of us will be interested in this up to date news. I will now reply to Stefan and his brother and thank them for this contribution. Incidentally I have not edited his text in any way.


David Green

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dianaw

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#574 [url]

Oct 12 11 8:09 PM

Hi David, lovely to hear the story of Trougott after leaving Fairfield & I can understand the villagers of Kropp liking him very much.  Although he was 4 years older than me, I remember him to be very kind & always smiling, such a young gentleman.  Sad to hear of his illness & my regards go to Stefan, Axel & the family.  love Di 

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malsal

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#575 [url]

Oct 12 11 8:39 PM

It is always sad to see the death of an old boy especially such a gentle caring person as Trougott ,and I too would like to send my regards to to his Son and family .Rest in peace TROUGOTT  I'm sure you will be receiving your just deserts in Heaven .     Malc S 

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#576 [url]

Oct 12 11 8:42 PM



Wow David what a tremendous story about Traugott Winkler, someone I never knew or heard about when I was in the home. But I am glad that you shared this story about a truly remarkable man.

I was also very interested in the area where he lived and worked, because my father was a POW there (Stalag 18a) which I have done alot of research on over the years. The Germans I met were fantastic to me and I will never forget their hospitality and the help they gave me in trying to build up a picture of my dad.

Also, the more I look and read other peoples accounts of other Fairfielders the more I am convinced that I was in the right place at the right time. Thank you for sharing your memories.

It was great to speak to you at the reunion and I hope you are doing well. How is your brother doing, I hope he is doing well.

Take care

Martin Reid
Trevean

Martin Reid

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#577 [url]

Oct 15 11 4:34 PM

Hello Martin

It is nice to receive your comments.
Stephen is doing very well and has actually been to a Barbershop Convention in Ireland last weekend.
Yes the Trougott Winkler story is a nice one if sad that he died aged only 65. We had about 10 German children at Fairfield as you may know but only Trougott and Heinz Plunkett have kept in touch that is apart from the lovely Dorle who was at the reunion.
I have sent an email to Heinz asking about his sister Helga and encouraging him to look at this forum.
I have also emailed Stefan and Axel Winkler and thanked them for the story about their father. I passed on your comments about the hospitality you received over there.

Kind regards

David

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malsal

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#578 [url]

Oct 15 11 8:04 PM

Hi David  Glad to hear Stev is doing well ,you say you have been in touch with Heinz Plunkett give him my regards and tell him I would love him to contact me .by email if he wants I'll send it you private .  Oh it might interest you to Know I went to the Nottingham Beer festival Thurs/Fri and had  27 different Beers , third and half pints I hasten to add .                                                                            Cheers  Malc S

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dave

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#579 [url]

Oct 15 11 9:41 PM

Hi Malc,
I am beginning to think you and I must be connected some how. We both seem to have same taste for beer and puddings

Just enjoying a Hobgoblin.

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malsal

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#580 [url]

Oct 15 11 10:24 PM


Hi Dave we are ,we are all the NCH family and were brought up to enjoy the good things in life ,like puddings  though booze was an acquired taste but I'll drink to you with Hobgoblin Cheers   Malc S 

   Ps you have already got a brother Malcolm as well haven't you

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