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#101 [url]

May 13 11 9:35 AM

Hi Di I can remember sticking cigarette packets on the spokes of our bikes to make them sound like motor bikes and then up and down Pannal Ash or further, you just don,t see things like that anymore,can you remember playing marbles or Liggies as we called it i spent all my time in the playground at Western playing sometimes going home with my pockets bulging.
Terry

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dianaw

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#102 [url]

May 13 11 4:29 PM

Hi Malcolm, I just love your sense of humour, you always bring a smile to my face.  What's this aging thing, are you trying to tell us something!
love Di

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#104 [url]

May 13 11 7:43 PM

Hi I remember liggies we were always playing,outside the back of no. 7 was a hole in the ground just for liggies,if you look on the photo page 26 I think you will see a small boy playing liggies out the back of no.7,a great game. x

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#105 [url]

May 14 11 1:31 PM

Loved playing 'liggies' I remember that hole Pat & if that was taken , the holes round the handles of the man-holes served just as well !! Also remember playing 'Jacks' & French skipping with elastic. Happy days. Beats sitting in front of a computer screen for hours on end!!

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#107 [url]

May 23 11 5:17 PM

Hi,
Seem to recall the "workshop" or the place where the shoes were kept being at the back of Wellfield, our bedroom window over looked Harlow hill path and the open fields at the back.
Brian.

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#108 [url]

May 23 11 5:52 PM

Hi,
I can remember going to Capernwray Hall, but cannot remember why, must have being boring or bad memory. Does any one remember Sister Edna?
Brian. 

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#109 [url]

May 23 11 8:30 PM

 Yes Brian.  I can remember sister Edna.  There was an extension with a flat roof tacked onto the side of Wellfield next to the cinder track.  We used to have great fun climbing onto it, leaping off, and generally making a nuisance of ourselves.  Sister Edna caught me once and told me off   .........    You'll see in several of the previous postings that we've been chatting about that little house where all the new shoes were kept.  I expect you remember Mr Wray too ?  He was the one to whom we'd go when we needed new shoes.  
Jennifer

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clive

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#110 [url]

May 23 11 9:03 PM

Dear Phillip,

Dropping the word Orphanage was the correct thing to do as the majority of children in NCH care were not orphans and they resented being described as such. 

Is there any evidence from NCH Annual Reports that dropping the word Orphanage from publicity material resulted in a drop in NCH voluntary income? 

I am not sure about your point  that " it possibly took years to get the public to know that they were the same group that was helping children" as the words "and orphange" were usually presented in a smaller typeface on headed paper and other publicity material.

Best wishes,

Clive

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philip

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#111 [url]

May 23 11 9:29 PM

Clive,
To most member of the public, if it came to giving monet to a childrens charity, having the word Orphanage in your main title, would mean you were looking after those poor children who had been orphaned and would have no relatives to help out, thus a very deserving cause.
If it was a charity just rasing funds for a Children's Home, a possible benafactior might look for another group that did use the word Orphan.
-------------------
In Harpenden I arrived in 1965, other than a small sign that included the word orphanage, most of the larger signs that the public would ever see just read Children's Home.

At school, if I spoke to the parents of friends, most of them thought we were still were orphans or had parents that had totally abandoned us. We were possibly 10% of the school the population.
Parents were also surprised when I told them that I went home to my mother for weekend visits every three weeks, and that during the summer holidays I spent most of my time away from The Children's Home.

Loosing the word orphanage might have been dropped many years before, but we were still kids from the orphanage.

Philip

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royl

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#112 [url]

May 23 11 10:50 PM

  Philip and Clive,
   There are some interesting points here but I am not sure that at the time 'Orphanage' was dropped it made much difference.   My feeling is that the public at large only ackowledged two types of child institutions viz. Borstal and childrens homes; for the general public this latter encompased all forms of child care.  The distinction was quite clear, bad 'uns to one place, the rest to the other.   If you wanted to be charitable you gave to the other as the former were known to be state run institutions.
     I do think that we might have scored by the use of orphanage when contributors were deciding which 'childrens home' to give to.  Dr Barnardos was the better known in the 50's and even then was refered to as plain 'Barnados'. For the NCH to have a heart tugging 'and Orphanage' spelled out was probably worth a few extra pounds.  It is interesting that although officially dropped no great moves were made to eradicate it. Last time I looked it still said NCH & O on the block at Highfield.

Roy



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#113 [url]

May 24 11 11:26 AM

Hi Clive When i first mentioned my feelings about the word orphanage i never expected so much response, i do however stick to my belief that dropping the word orphanage was indeed the right thing to do and obviously Highbury felt the same. I spend a good deal of the year in Thailand and there are quite a few childrens homes they still have the word orphanage attached. The majority of these children have been picked up on the streets and had nowhere to sleep and never knew when they would eat again very pathetic. Perhaps i will sugest to them next time i am there to drop the word.

Regards Terry

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#114 [url]

May 24 11 11:45 AM

Hi Sue You said you could not remember me at Fairfield i can remember you very well at no 3 you always seemed to have a runny nose, i think you used to take Sister Annes dog for a walk sometimes.
Regards Terry

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royl

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#115 [url]

May 24 11 1:50 PM

Hi Sue,

     Several times I have heard it said that humans, especally those dealing with kids, will remember the naughty ones first.   You have problems remembering others but they remember you -?? tic

Roy 

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#116 [url]

May 24 11 4:32 PM

Terry, you smooth talker you!
The dog Kim was the one with the runny nose and glossy coat, Sue was the one with the killer cheeky grin and if i remember right, could run around the houses like a whirling dervish, which, in your defence Sue, probably made people think you must have done some mischief.
Take care
Malc

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#117 [url]

May 24 11 6:31 PM

Hi Jennifer
Mr Wray was I thought a nice man, cannot remember anyone saying anything against him, he came to see me when I was in the sick bay for three days when I got stung on the top of my foot by a bumble bee while camping at Knaresbourgh some where along the Nidd. As you say that flat roof was just perfect height to climb up and down, invoking many a trip to the goose gog and crab apple batch.
smile

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#118 [url]

May 24 11 8:27 PM

Yes Brian, he was an absolute gentleman, and a wonderful roll model for you boys.  I'm sure you'll remember George Armstrong too, and you'll see some happy memories involving him in some of the recent posts.
Jennifer

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clive

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#119 [url]

May 25 11 6:27 PM

Dear Sue, Terry, Roy and Philip,

Thanks for your messages.

Yes, I agree that dropping the word Orphanage was the right thing to do and it will be good to obtain chapter and verse on this aspect of NCH history.

Philip, you suggest:-

"To most member of the public, if it came to giving monet to a childrens charity, having the word Orphanage in your main title, would mean you were looking after those poor children who had been orphaned and would have no relatives to help out, thus a very deserving cause"

However, the main British child care charities in the 1960's were Barnardo's, the Church of England Children's Society, and the National Children's Home.  Although we had and Orphanage in our previous title we were less known than Barnardo's and raised less money.

Sue, It is amazing that you didn't know you were not an orphan until you were told aged 8 that you had a Mother.  It most certainly wasn't your fault that you were in care.  Take care.

Best wishes,

Clive

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#120 [url]

May 25 11 11:10 PM

Hi Sue and Clive,
Amazing what 'we didnt know' isnt it. It wasnt until I got my records at age 60!, that correspondence regarding my Aunt and Uncle wanting to adopt me at 18 months, ie, just before I went to Harrogate, came to light. The Aunt was my fathers (small f deliberate) Sister and i knew her and my Uncle as I grew up, they visited me , I visited them, nothing was ever said about the adoption attempt. They had Five girls, I still correspond with one of the two left.
father was one of those who didn't want his own four kids, but didnt want anyone else to have them, I 'thanked' him once, by saying, that had he kept me i wouldn't be the Man I am now, I was brought up in love and caring and with feelings for others.
Take care
Malc

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