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philip

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Jul 19 11 1:49 PM

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#1 [url]

Jul 29 11 5:16 AM

hi my name is GerardBuckley and i lived in number 1 then welfield 1964 /1974 iv found some old girls and boys on face book how were in Fairfeild when i was Carol and Linda Mcorley the Hill sisters Sadi Cowie Sheila Laws Phillip Atkinson , in Harrogate were i live i bump in to Colin Windsor Brian and Rose Lawson Mike Hughes John and Geff to and ex staff Sid and Isabll rain ,i dident know John and Dennis had died i knew Maggy Strutt had died some years back she always had a poor heart lovely girl were geting older now so i expect sad news will come to are ears ever now and then iv told outhers of this site hope they will join up bye

This page is for the text on Harrogate items only.

-philip

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#2 [url]

Jul 29 11 8:24 AM

Hi Gerald and welcome to the forum. I see you live in Harrogate. Have you seen that we are having a reunion on 10th September? Have a look at the Topic headed "Harrogate Reunion 2011" for the details. It would be nice to see you there but please be sure to contact Di Ward on this site and ask her to add you to the ever growing list of people who will be there. 3 pm at the Pump Room Museum and from 5pm at The Harlow Inn,Otley Road.

David Green 
1942 - 1954

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#3 [url]

Aug 4 11 12:21 AM


Hi Malcolm T, Di & Terry,

At last I've managed to get back to you,in order to continue our reminiscences of Harrogate people in the 1950s.  It's strange how all of us remembered  the brother and his disabled sister who used to attend services at Trinity Church, but none of us can  remember their names. 

 After that, Di, you sent a post mentioning Misses Houseman and Worship, who were pillars of the Harlow Chapel.  I have a very vague memory of Miss Houseman, but who could ever forget Miss Worship?  That lady certainly had a good set of lungs, and true to her name, she did worship faithfully and loudly.  Her contralto voice was always several decibels louder than that of anyone else. In the larger space of Trinity Church, this would have been fine, but within the confines of Harlow Chapel, it tended to be somewhat overpowering. 

Speaking of singers, I wonder how many people can remember two of the Trinity Church Choir soloists, Mr.Frank Langton (bass) and Mary Worth (soprano)?  I always admired Mrs. Worth's rendition at Easter time, of 'I know that my Redeemer liveth' (from Handel's Messiah).  Later, when I went to Harrogate Tech, I was delighted to discover that she was to be our music teacher.  There were quite a few lads in our class, whose voices had just broken, and who were all set to disrupt the music lessons simply because they felt a bit self conscious, but our teacher had their measure.  Instead setting us the usual insipid folk songs to learn, she chose rousing sea shanties and negro spirituals, which went down very well.

Lastly, does anyone remember Lily Bateson ?  I think she was the aunt of Tom Bateson, and she lived in Whinney Lane in one of the cottages near the sweet shop. I used to love going to
that shop on a Saturday afternoon.  My favourite sweets were Liquorice Allsorts;  Although I did not suffer from that condition, they were very good as an antidote to constipation and tasted much better than Sister Beth's doses of Syrup of Figs!
                                                                 Dorle.

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#4 [url]

Aug 4 11 12:45 AM

Hello Dorle,
The name Bateson is really clanging bells with me but cant remember face or place.
The sweet shop on Whinney Lane was my favorite too, Run by the Misse's Horne sisters I believe. We would stand for ages with our pennies trying to decide what to have, cinder toffee, gobstoppers and on and on, and they would patiently wait or serve other customers. They knew we were Fairfield residents and I've had the odd favor or two from them when I was short of a farthing, who remebers farthings?, God I feel Old. Sister Beths Syrup of Figs ewwww. I know she didn't invent it but she was good at getting it down our throats. I think that was an occasion for one of my "I am's", because she would be saying, "Open your mouth Malcolm".
That brings to mind the daily taking of Cod Liver Oil and Orange concentrate. You had to make sure you got them in the right order or you tasted CLO all day long. 
Great times
Take Care
Malc

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dianaw

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#5 [url]

Aug 4 11 1:21 PM

Ah Dorle, you've done it again, brought back more memories.  Now I remember Miss Worship's singing.  Miss Houseman was quite plump & softer.  Frank Langton doesn't come to mind, but Mary Worth certainly does & the Messiah at Easter.  I used to love the Hallelujah Chorus. What a memory for names you have.  The only Batesons I knew were Tom & of course Joan, who worked endlessly at Fairfield.  Not only as Pop's secretary, but all sorts of different jobs.  Unfortunately I couldn't attend her funeral, but I understand there was a good few OBs & Gs there.

Malc, Syrup of Figs - yummy, I used to be given Luquid Parafin & it was vile, Sister had to hold my nose to get it down me.  I loved the Orange concentrate, but Cod Liver Oil ugh, Then we progressed to Malt which also had Cod Liver Oil added & that wasn't so bad.  Fancy you remembering the Horne sisters, all I remember was the corner sweet shop & sweet coming off rations when I was 12. 
love Di

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#6 [url]

Aug 4 11 6:38 PM

Hi Dorle / Di

You mention a Mrs Worth, was she Mrs or Miss. I remember my music teacher at St Peters School being called Miss Worth, she was another sister Beth Heggie, she was adorable, I could never sing and Sister Sybil threw me out of the Fairfield choir, I was never good at school either, always bad school reports apart from Miss Worths report, she always made me top of the class  she never punished me at all and always gave me a marvellous report although it didnt fool Sister Sybil .   This just seems rather a coincidence the name and the music connection. Do you think same lady or not?

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#7 [url]

Aug 5 11 1:52 AM

Hi Malcolm and Di,

I too can remember queuing up for the dreaded medicine just before leaving for school.  Sister Beth always had an array of different bottles and spoons at the ready.  My particular pet hate was a mixture of fishy Cod Liver Oil mixed with Parishes Food, a sickly sweet red concoction.  The Parishes Food was supposed to help anyone who was anaemic.  In my case, I  just looked anaemic because of my pale hair and skin, but in reality I wasn't anaemic at all.  Every time I watched Sister Beth measuring out the Cod Liver Oil, I felt myself gagging, as fish was something that had never agreed with me.  I would hold my nose while taking the revolting stuff and  then bolt out of the back door and into the girls' outside loo to try and get rid of it.  I remember David Marsden, who suffered from alopecia used to be given a dose of  a tonic called Minidex, It was gooey and greenish yellow. When we referred to it as 'snot', in David's hearing, Sister Beth would fix us with one of her looks , which would silence us immediately and send us scuttling away off to school. As soon as sugar was no longer rationed, Sister Beth would 'sugar' the medicine ceremony by doling out a slice of coconut ice for each of us to take away with us.

Talking of sweet things, takes me back once again to Whinney Lane, and another resident who worked at Fairfield, over the years.  Di, you and I have already mentioned her previously, and your description of her was very apt, 'a little woman with pins stuck in her mouth'.  This was, of course, Mrs. Daniels, who used to come  to the houses in turn to repair the bed linen. I believe she was a widow, and was possibly related by marriage to the Daniels family, who owned the farm. In later years when I was studying at Durham, her son who was also a student there, used to to turn up regularlyat the Saturday night hop (dance) in the Town Hall.

The last name I want to mention in this post is Mrs. Rhodes, (I can't remember whether Mr. Rhodes, was still alive ) a wealthy lady, who lived in a large house in the Follifoot area.  I believe she helped towards making Christmas at Fairfield such a magical event, by giving every Fairfield child  the chance to see the annual  pantomime at the Royal Hall.  The last time I saw the Christmas pantomime at the Royal Hall, was about twelve years ago. That story will keep until another time.    Dorle.


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#8 [url]

Aug 5 11 2:46 AM

Hi Miriam,

I do think your music teacher, Mary Worth, was the same lady who was mentioned in my last post.  It was misleading of me to have referred to her as Mrs. Worth.  Professionally as a singer and teacher, she was always known as Miss Mary Worth, although she was actually a married lady.  It seems to me that she was remarkably insightful in her attitude towards you.  She could sense that you needed some encouragement, and as a result you responded in a positive way.  If some of your other teachers had taken a leaf out of her book, you might have had a better experience at school.  You shouldn't view yourself in such a negative light.  Very few people are good at everything;  we all have our weak spots.  I was very impressed by your enthusiastic description of the interior of Rowanlea in your last post to me.It was almost as though you were seeing it  again for the first time. Have you ever thought of joining a creative writing group in your area?  You can usually find out about such groups at your local library.  It is a very enjoyable way of meeting people of all ages and abilities, and you may discover a talent that you didn't know you possessed.  Why not give it a go?      Dorle.

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#9 [url]

Aug 5 11 7:33 AM

THAT MALT WITH COD LIVER OIL IN IT

I can recall lining up for a large tablespoon full of this and actually quite liking it when compared to the straight cod liver oil we had been having previously. 
In my home Janet does about 99% of the cooking etc but my one duty in that department is to make the bread using our Panasonic breadmaker. We have a wholemeal  loaf menu but have added one or two things including molasses. Every time I open the jat to get a tablespoon full of molasses I am reminded of Sister Edith administering the malt and especially when I lick the spoon before putting into the sink to wash.
Maybe it is things such as this which gave us good health  Most of us were lucky enough to have a very very active childhood and to have all that energy to play sport etc etc we must have had a well balanced diet despite some of my time being during and immediately after WW2 when food was rationed. Who can forget that sweets were rationed to 2.5 ounces per child per week.

Happy memories.

David

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#10 [url]

Aug 5 11 7:28 PM

Hi Gerard what year were you in No 1. I think I may remember your name, I was in No 1 Rowanlea with my brother Bernard Morgan, I cant picture you although for some very bizaar reason I seem to think you had a very pale complexion. Bernard and I  came to Fairfield approx 1952 ish. Will you be attending the reunion? if so I look forward to meeting you.

Miriam x

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#11 [url]

Aug 5 11 8:04 PM

Hi Dorle

thanks for your kind words. Although I never really shone at school I have done pretty good with jobs over the years I have my present job which I entered into at 50 years of age  with  a very large global insurance company. What a great idea you say for joining a local writing group, I may consider this when I do eventually retire, it will keep me out of mischief.  I can always notch up the fact also that I was once treasurer of a football club sadly not my beloved Liverpool, but a local boys  club,( although many years ago )I really threw myself into this I absolutly loved it I  was part of the fund raising committee also, and another of my enjoyable jobs was to send "write ups!" to the local paper of our matches (my sons team). Needless to say he always got a mention ha ha.

 When you posted the layout of Rowanlea I was really in there, as I replied it was like I had taken a step back in time, I could have pin pointed so much more also. You mentione the stained glass window of Red Riding Hood, was this on the turn of the stairs before ascending the last few stairs, although I may be guessing at this.  I remember the window sills in the girsl bedroom being very wide, a few of us including  Mr Malcol Tomlinson were hiding behind the curtains one Saturday afternoon, because we had been made to play out in the rain, so we crept back in the house and hid, although not for long as we were all gigigling and got found out.

I am so glad I picked up on your mention of Miss Worth,  as not many NCH ragamuffins would know her as they were all lucky enough to go  to Wheatlads school, and I had to go to a girls school, Sister Sybil thought It would make me more of a lady - it didnt work!!!!  All these years on and I have never forgotten her or Sister Beth, and I must have been so very young when Sister Beth left Fairfield. Its a shame Miss Worth never had any NCH connections because she had the best of hearts. Anyway I am rambling on so will sign off for now. I am sure I read that you will be attneding the reunion, so I really look forward to meeting with you. take care . Miriam x


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dianaw

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#12 [url]

Aug 5 11 8:08 PM

Hi Dorle, How on earth did you know the name of the red sweet stuff that was in the cod liver oil, which I used to have, but never knew what it was called or what it was for.  I was always a pale, skinny child when very young & any seconds of favourite food, I was given first choice, much to the disgust of the others.  Sister was determined to build me up. It's a different story now & I could do with losing a good few pounds! 

Another name you've come up with, Mrs Rhodes, who used to come to tea on Sunday, every so often at No. 2.  We were all warned to be on our best behaviour & Sister used to put on her posh voice & there were always extra cakes.  I never knew she was the benefactor of the Christmas pantomimes. As we queued up in the foyer of the Royal Hall, we were handed a tangerine & some sweets, however, I'll wait for further memories from you on this topic, as you have marvelous recall. 
love Di

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dianaw

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#13 [url]

Aug 5 11 8:48 PM

Hi Jennifer, A lovely description of No. 7 & although it sounds as if the layout was totally different from our house, the pantry sounded the same. We only had the one which was accessed from the kitchen, long & narrow with the cold slab at the end & the wire netting on the small window.  Lined with shelves where the cocoa, sugar, flour etc. were housed & tins of baking stacked on the floor.  There was great excitement when we got a 'poshy washer', you had to push a lever backwards & forewards umpteen times & the extensive instructions were on the lid which we could recite word for word.  Attached was an enormous wringer, needing Herculean strength to manipulate. The boys jobs were to clean all the shoes in the washouse, clean the ashes from the fire & bring in the coal.  In winter, we all had to sit round the fire in a semi circle, so the heat was evenly distributed.  We never had central heating whilst I was there & it was so cold, particularly upstairs, I do not know how we survived, but I can't remember us suffering from many colds & flu.
love Di

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dave

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#14 [url]

Aug 5 11 9:16 PM

Hi Dave,
Dave here!
I am glad to see we at Harpenden were not the only ones to have spoonfuls of cod liver oil and molasses poured down our throats. We were not lucky enough, however, to have it as a combined  intake. We Harpos had to endure a big spoon of one followed by a big spoon of the other. OK if the cod liver oil was delivered first but pretty horrible if the molasses came first. Not sure if others from Harpenden can confirm this but our sister delivered it in this manner and I am convinced we were given it in what order sister deemed right according to our behaviour.

It is really good to read of other branches experiences.

All the best
Dave

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#15 [url]

Aug 5 11 10:35 PM

Yes Di, the layout of the kitchen & dining room was slightly different in numbers seven & eight to the rest of the houses.  Dorothy and I lived in number one for quite a while, so we knew it very well.  In number seven, the access to the boot room was via the dining room AND had another door to outside via the verandah.  But I think the boot room was only accessible from the verandah in number one.  I think the kitchen was also bigger in number seven because it had the 'inglenook' and clothes airer in there.  This was in the dining room in number one.  All the other houses had a vestibule too, whereas the front door of numbers seven & eight opened directly into the hall.  Otherwise the design of all the houses was pretty much the same.


Love Jennifer

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#16 [url]

Aug 6 11 12:05 PM

  I've just remembered something that might interest you Di, speaking of the 'poshy washer.'   We used to have the laundry van which came every week to take away the dirty bed linen which was put in a big wicker basket. ( yet another good place to hide during hide-&-seek )  But in the latter years, and I think after you left,  we had a laundrette built in the small space between the back of the church and the community hall.  This caused GREAT excitement I can tell you, and must have made life so much easier for the sisters.
Love Jennifer

PS 
I always did my washing by hand even after I was married and with a home of my own.  I spurned  the use of a washing machine because I considered it to be the invention of the devil, and would spend all weekend toiling over dirty socks.  How stupid is that !?  I finally succumbed to the joys of a washing machine in about 1980, and it proved to be such a novelty that I'd sit and watch it   .......    der !



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dianaw

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#17 [url]

Aug 7 11 10:59 AM

Hi Jennifer, I seem to remember all our washing was done in No. 2 & prior to the 'poshy washer', the sheets etc. were washed in a big boiler in the washouse.  The Sisters certainly had to work hard, particularly in the earlier days.  I don't remember a laundry van & the laundrette was after my time. In our first house, a 2 up, 2 down terraced house, I have a photo of our brand new twin-tub washing machine with our baby Sandra sitting on an old frayed carpet in front. Just shows where my priorities lay! 
love Di

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#18 [url]

Aug 7 11 11:14 AM

Hi All ! I have just been looking at a map of Australia and i was pleasantly surprised when i saw a town in the suburbs of Sydney called " Fairfield "it is about 30 klm West of Sydney, another surprise was studying the map somemore i found there was a town in Victoria called " Brookside "
I wonder if other countries or states have possibly got the same names.
Regards Terry

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#19 [url]

Aug 7 11 11:23 AM

Hi Di ! What is the latest on the reunion are the figures the same or has anyone else said they will be coming ?. I never saw a washing machine at Harrogate i do remember the ladies who did the washing and they used to have something they used by hand to turn the washing in the tub. I do remember the wicker baskets what Jennifer mentioned.
Love Terry X

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#20 [url]

Aug 7 11 11:27 AM

 I think one thing that put me off washing machines Di, was when I was once using my mother-in-laws machine which had an electric mangle.  It grabbed hold of the tip of the finger of my rubber glove, and didn't let go.  You'd be surprised just how far those rubber gloves will stretch !    ......   And Terry,  I think the tool the ladies used to use might have been called a 'Dolly Peg ?
Love, Jennifer

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